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A Nepali adolescent girl reads a radio script in a recording booth.

GAGE blog

GAGE will generate research-based evidence by engaging with multiple stakeholders, including adolescent girls and boys themselves, their parents, community role models, programme implementers, service providers, and key informants from local governments. Our blog aims to capture the diversity of these actors’ perspectives and voices and will showcase different viewpoints on adolescence, gender and development. We hope, by actively involving adolescents, to empower them to create change in their own lives—as well as their families and communities—and by bringing in a range of adult views, to better highlight how challenges and opportunities are shifting over time.

Photo stories

Photo stories

Explore adolescents' daily experiences in diverse contexts

/blog/photo-stories
Syrian refugee Ingrid Gercama

Girls and technology

How is UNICEF Jordan using technology to help empower adolescent refugees?

/blog-empowering-youth-technology
UNFPA UNICEF/Olivier Asselin

Girls' access to SRH services threatened

GAGE Director Dr Nicola Jones comments on the impact of the UNFPA defunding on women and girls

https://www.odi.org/comment/10508-president-trump-facts-defunding-un-population…

Engaging with the community: reflections on a dissemination workshop to share findings on research with adolescents with a disability in Palestine

Given that young people with a disability face considerable discrimination and stigma in the Palestinian context, we wanted to prioritise sharing the findings of our research with the local community to generate a discussion about potential local strategies to enhance young people’s wellbeing.

Dance bars, doharis and massage parlours: Exploring the lives of Nepali adolescent girls working in the adult entertainment sector (AES) in Nepal

NISER, with ODI, has been conducting research on adolescents since 2012, focusing particularly on social norms, intimate partner violence, and mobility and employment. Our findings show that, while there is some positive change, norms around mobility and marriage are still stringent for girls.
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