We only use your email address to send you the newsletter and to see how many people are opening our emails. A full privacy policy can be viewed here. You can change your mind at any time and update your preferences or unsubscribe.

Adolescent girl from an indigenous village, Bangladesh © Nathalie Bertrams / GAGE 2022

Adolescent girls’ and boys’ experiences of violence: evidence from Gender and Adolescence: Global Evidence (GAGE)

10.10.22 | Bangladesh | Ethiopia | Jordan

Bodily integrity and freedom from violence | Child marriage | FGM | Gender-based violence | Violence

Authors

Elizabeth Presler-Marshall, Erin Oakley, Shoroq Abu Hamad, Riyad Diab, Nicola Jones, Bassam Abu Hamad, Sarah Alheiwidi, Workneh Yadete, Jennifer Seager and Sarah Baird

Age- and gender-based violence during adolescence is widespread, and the risks permeate all spheres of adolescents’ lives – family and marriage, schools, peer networks and communities. Yet this violence affects girls and boys very differently within and across low- and middle-income country (LMIC) contexts. Midway through the Sustainable Development Agenda, data from the Gender and Adolescence: Global Evidence (GAGE) research programme reinforces the urgency of investing in a tailored, adequately resourced package of interventions, coordinated across sectors and development actors. This would allow the global community to make meaningful progress towards Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) 5 and 16 to eliminate all forms of violence affecting young people.

This brief draws on data collected in three of GAGE’s core countries: Bangladesh, Ethiopia and Jordan using mixed-methods research. GAGE findings highlight that adolescent girls – and boys – regularly face myriad forms of age- and gender-based violence. Risks are context-dependent, which in some cases means adolescent girls and boys do not perceive what they are experiencing as violence, and in other cases leads them to embrace such behaviour because it demonstrates to their peers and communities that they are conforming to social norms. Critical to tackling this violence is a recognition that age-based violence is often deeply gendered; that gender norms leave girls and boys at heightened risk of different types of violence; and that sometimes the best way to support girls to lead lives free of violence is to ensure that the boys in their environments are also free of violence.

Suggested citation

Presler-Marshall, E., Oakley, E., Abu Hamad, Sh., Diab, R., Jones, N., Abu Hammad, B., Alheiwidi, S., Yadete, W., Seager, J., and Baird, S. (2022) ‘Adolescent girls’ and boys’ experiences of violence: evidence from Gender and Adolescence: Global Evidence (GAGE)’. Policy brief. London: Gender and Adolescence: Global Evidence.


Related publications

Reports
03.12.20
‘Girls don’t shout if they are raped… that is taboo’: exploring barriers to Ethiopian adolescents’ freedom from age- and gender-based violence
Bodily integrity and freedom from violence
Ethiopia
Read more
03.12.20 | Bodily integrity and freedom from violence | Reports | Ethiopia
‘Girls don’t shout if they are raped… that is taboo’: exploring barriers to Ethiopian adolescents’ freedom from age- and gender-based violence
Read more
Reports
24.08.22
Exploring the patterning and drivers of FGM/C and child marriage in pastoralist Ethiopia: Baseline report from Afar and Somali regions
Bodily integrity and freedom from violence
Ethiopia
Read more
24.08.22 | Bodily integrity and freedom from violence | Reports | Ethiopia
Exploring the patterning and drivers of FGM/C and child marriage in pastoralist Ethiopia: Baseline report from Afar and Somali regions
Read more
Journal articles
10.02.22
Displacement, Violence, and Mental Health: Evidence from Rohingya Adolescents in Cox's Bazar, Bangladesh
Bodily integrity and freedom from violence
Bangladesh
Read more
10.02.22 | Bodily integrity and freedom from violence | Journal articles | Bangladesh
Displacement, Violence, and Mental Health: Evidence from Rohingya Adolescents in Cox's Bazar, Bangladesh
Read more